Category: Expandables & Hybrids

Bullet Crossfire RV from KeystoneBigger isn’t always better – that’s especially true when it comes to RVing. Sure, big RVs offer lots of amenities (including residential-sized appliances) and a lots of elbow room, but small RVs offer more than just charm. They’re lighter and easier to tow than their king-sized counterparts – not to mention easier to maneuver into the campsite. Plus, their diminutive size allows them to be taken on the roads less traveled; you won’t be limited to large RV lots with a small RV, so you can enjoy and explore the wildernessto your heart’s content – if that’s your camping style.

Illustration of small RV travel trailerNo doubt about it. RV camping is a big adventure. But you don’t need a big RV to have big-RV fun. A small RV can maximize your camping enjoyment while minimizing your costs. There are many kinds of small RVs on the market, and one is sure to fit your camping needs. Want to learn more facts about small RVs? Check out 10 Fast Facts for Small RVs.

Couple grilling outside their small RV travel trailerWhen you’re considering an RV purchase, it’s good to first think about how you will be using the camper. Does your current lifestyle include a 9-to-5 job and a house? If so, maybe you’ll be using your RV for short, weekend trips. Or maybe you are retired and looking to visit every state park from the east to the west coast. Then, you could be more of a full-time RVer. While you can create any lifestyle you want with your new RV, here are a few common scenarios to help you think about all the possibilities.