Category: Travel Tips

There’s a time for recreation and a time for relaxation. Watching TV can be a great way to unwind after a day of adventure or the perfect way to spend a rainy day. What are the options for binging your favorite shows from your RV? Let’s dig into the options for TV service for RVs and what the pros and cons are.

TV Service for RV Options

Streaming Services

TV entertainment has come a long way in a relatively short time. As more and more campground facilities upgrade their WiFi connections, the most common way to enjoy shows on the go has become streaming services.

Pros:

Streaming services provide the widest library of content when it comes to TV service for RVs. There isn’t a huge expense with streaming service and as long as you can get a strong enough signal, it’s easily accessible. Some streaming services offer a “download before you go” option which comes in handy if you’re camping in an area with a weak signal or don’t have a WiFi booster.

Cons:

While each streaming service is relatively inexpensive, it can add up quickly when you want to keep up with all the various services. Spotty mobile data signals are another issue. If you choose to camp in remote locations far away from campgrounds with Wifi, you may not get the best TV service for RVs – not to mention really hogging your internet bandwidth.

Satellite

Satellite TV service for RVs was the leader in RV TV options for years. Many RVs still come pre-wired for satellite but with the many other options that are becoming widely available, it’s difficult to judge how long satellite will be near the top of the list of options of TV service for RVs.

Pros:

One of the finest things about satellite TV is the great selection of channels most services offer. There’s a much better chance of getting a signal in the middle of nowhere with satellite – a great pro for boondockers. There are also some pay-as-you-go options available with satellite which can appeal to weekend RV warriors who don’t want to miss the big game.

Cons:

One of the biggest cons with satellites is the trouble with reception when camping in an area with overhead obstructions. While satellites can be great for remote locations, if you enjoy boondocking deep in the woods surrounded by trees, satellite might not be your best bet. Surprisingly, even bad weather can interrupt the TV service for RVs using satellite. This can be a real inconvenience if you’re watching the weather channel!

Another drawback can be the expense. Satellite requires a physical upgrade to your RV. Even if yours comes pre-wired for satellite, you still have to purchase the actual system. It also becomes another thing to remember and maintain when caring for your RV.

Camp Cable

Planning trips to include campgrounds that have direct cable hookups is one way to ensure TV service for RVs.

Pros:

Cable hookup is generally a reliable TV service for RVs because it’s hardwired to your RV. The selection of channels is usually good but it is dependent on the campground’s service plan, so it can vary.

If you’re a frugal camper, cable is one of the best options because you only have to worry about it when you’re using it and there’s little to maintain.

Cons:

One notable drawback with cable TV service for RVs is that it requires extra hookups for your RV. Also, hooking up to anything at all when you’re camping in remote areas means cable TV is not an option. Not all campgrounds offer cable hookup, so if that is what you’re relying on as TV service for your RV, it’ll require doing some research beforehand. And remember, even if the campground offers cable, you may not always get access to the channels you want.

Over the Air Antennas

Who says there’s no such thing as free entertainment? If you’re big on patience and low on pickiness, you can get plenty of free TV Service for RVs with the old rabbit ears.

Pros:

The best thing about antennas is that there isn’t much of an investment necessary. With this TV option, you can spend as much as your budget allows for an RV upgrade to get the antenna of your choice. Antennas can technically be used anywhere which makes it a good option for boondocking or dispersed camping. Antennas may be old fashioned in the grand scheme of TV service for RVs, but even if the variety is limited, they provide distraction on longer trips and generally access to the major networks for local news and weather.

Cons:

If you are particular about the shows you watch, antennas may not be for you due to the very limited options in terms of channels. Antennas are another upgrade to your RV that you’ll have to maintain. The reception you get on your antenna will vary quite a bit depending on your location.

They are also not the option for anyone with low levels of patience. It can be a tedious task to manually adjust the antenna to get a clear signal – which can be lost the moment someone stands up to get a snack. It’s a phenomenon that could really test your self-control, especially because the signal tends to go out right at the best part of a movie or right before the winning touchdown of the game!

So, whether your motivation is relaxation, distraction, or binging your favorite show, choose the best TV service for RVs that works for you, your budget, and your camping style.

Contact RV Wholesale Superstore

The professionals at RV Wholesale Superstore are ready to help you find the perfect RV for you and your family. Visit us in-person at 5080 W. Alexis Road, in Sylvania, OH or call us at (866) 640-9871

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Memories are some of the best things you make when you’re RVing. Chances are, you’ll make some dirty clothes, too! Whether you’re a weekend warrior or living the RV life full-time, it’s a given that you will end up with some laundry to do. What’s the best way to handle RV laundry? Depending on the duration of your trip and the amount of clothes you need to launder, there are several options that can keep your clothes from getting a little too “campy.”

RV with Washer & Dryer

Ideally, RV laundry can be done right in your RV if you have a washer and dryer with you. Many RVs come equipped with washer and dryer, or hookups for them. Living the RV life can certainly feel like home when you are only a few steps from the laundry facility.

Keep in mind that the capacity of small RV laundry appliances tends to be much lower than full-size models. Planning one or two small loads a day can help you keep up with dirty clothes – especially if you have children. When you are living the RV life full-time it helps keep the small space tidy. If you are just taking short trips, you won’t have a mountain to wash when you return home.

The convenience of laundry at your fingertips means you can pack fewer items of clothing knowing that you can do laundry whenever the need arises. It’s also a great way to ensure there’s always dry towels for swimming – a must when camping near lakes, rivers, water parks, or the ocean.

If you prefer camping in remote locations where electrical and water hookups may not be readily available, then RV laundry appliances may not be as much of a high priority. The good news is there are plenty of alternatives.

Campsite Laundromat

Many campgrounds have laundry facilities on site. You can do research ahead of time and see if a laundromat is mentioned on the campground’s website. Knowing whether laundry services are available where you’ll be staying is a great way to plan ahead when you are packing. If you know that you’ll have access to washers and dryers, you can pack lighter and save space.

Campground laundry facilities can be a good compromise between having RV laundry and going to a laundromat. They give you the convenience of having laundry close by but eliminate the need for keeping a washer/dryer combo in your RV. They also provide larger “home-sized” machines, so you can wash a lot more in one load than the smaller RV laundry models. Just like campground etiquette, be sure to practice laundromat etiquette. Leaving laundry unattended or washing heavily soiled items that may leave residue behind are practices to avoid.

When there’s no laundromat at your campground, you’ll need to find other laundry options if you know you’ll run out of clean clothes or towels before the end of your stay.

Local City Laundromat

When there aren’t washers and dryers at your campground, the next best thing is a laundromat in the nearest city. Depending on how remotely you are camping, it could be quite a drive. So, if you know you’ll be needing to take a long trip for laundry, you can plan it mid-stay and make a day of it. Stock up on any groceries or other needs while you’re in town. Maybe even catch a movie or find out if there are any local areas of interest to explore.

Some laundromats have drop-off service. If you’re on a busy schedule, or wanted to make a day of sightseeing, dropping off your laundry to be completed and ready for your return is a great option.

Most laundromats are similar no matter the town, though they may differ in their level of modernness. You may find state-of-the art new washers and dryers or it may feel like you’ve taken a step back in time. If you forget your quarters, many laundromats are upgrading to new equipment that accepts credit cards. Some even offer free WiFi, Cable TV, and charging stations for phones, tablets and laptops! This can really be a goldmine if you’re remote camping and want to save on batteries. But at the very least, the laundromat is a means to clean laundry.

Handwashing & Line Drying

Believe it or not, there weren’t always appliances for cleaning clothes. In fact, you don’t even need them! Washing clothes by hand and line drying them is quick and easy when you only have a few lightly soiled items and is a great solution in a pinch or when boondocking. All you need is a tub, water and soap.

For heavier soil you may need some tools to help scrub out the dirt. There are many inexpensive options from small hand-held plastic washboards to washtub/washboard combination tools. A laundry line or bungee cord can be strung up between trees, between a tree and your RV, or even secured between your RV and your RV toad if you have one. Just add clothespins!

Portable Washer & Dryer

If scrubbing clothes isn’t your ideal solution for RV laundry, a portable washer/dryer combo might be the perfect solution for you even if your RV doesn’t have hookups. These little combo appliances only handle small loads of laundry, but if you want an automatic process in a small space, it could be just the ticket – and save you a trip to the laundromat.

Packing Extra Clothes

The final solution is the obvious one – pack more clothes! You’ll avoid laundry altogether giving you more time to enjoy your vacation. It’s a great solution if you aren’t doing full time RV living. Simply make sure you have the room to pack (or overpack) your outfits and that you don’t mind spending the time playing catch-up with your laundry when you get home.

If the pack now, wash later option is your RV laundry solution of choice, it’s important to plan ahead when packing. There are loads of situations that can make the dirty clothes pile up quickly! Watch the weather for rain which can cause muddy terrain and call for frequent clothing changes. Hiking, boating, or swimming can also add to the need for extra clothes.

Be as generous as space allows with your overpacking if you plan to forgo any RV laundry options. That way the memories you make on your trip won’t consist of stories like, “Remember the time Uncle Mike had to wear muddy pants all weekend and Aunt Suzie wouldn’t let him in the camper?”

Contact RV Wholesale Superstore

The professionals at RV Wholesale Superstore are ready to help you find the perfect RV for you and your family. Visit us in-person at 5080 W. Alexis Road, in Sylvania, OH or call us at (866) 640-9871

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Even the most experienced campers can feel thrust right back into being a novice when baby makes three. RV travel with toddlers or a baby – even to that favorite, familiar campsite – makes every moment a new adventure. Here are some simple tips to help you navigate camping and parenthood when it comes to RVing with young children.

It Starts with the Right RV

Often, the tent-camping lifestyle looks a lot different through newborn-parent eyes. If you’re searching for your first RV, choosing the right one can make a world of difference no matter the length of your trip.

A growing family is often motivation for an RV upgrade. Consider RVs with slide-outs. The extra space can help make it easier to fit things like a crib – a necessity for safe sleeping. The added floor space also gives your child more room to live and play as they grow. This is especially important for active toddlers when the weather is bad and they can’t be outside.

When choosing the right layout ultimately will make sure you have a good solution for where they will sleep – now and in the future. A bunkhouse may seem like overkill right now, but babies grow quickly! And if you’re planning to have more children, the right sleeping arrangements are a must. Remember to think about storage space. It is amazing the extra cargo you’ll have when planning RV travel with toddlers. There’s a lot needed to keep them safe and comfortable.

Learn Your State’s Car Seat Laws

Car seat laws differ from state to state. If you have a motorhome, these laws apply to your RV as well. Since you’ll be able to use your car seat in the tow vehicle, there won’t be any issues if you have a travel trailer or other towable RV. Babies can be distracting so getting comfortable towing an RV before you try to take a trip with your baby along is a wise time investment.  

Babyproof Your RV Like Your Home

RVs pose some unique challenges when babyproofing as well as the typical home risks. You’ll want to address the standard babyproofing areas you may already be use to such as:

  • Locking cabinets that house cleaning chemicals
  • Covering outlets
  • Locking drawers containing sharp objects
  • Installing guards for RV kitchen appliances

With RVs, there can be special challenges not found at home like:

  • Blocking RV staircases in 5th wheels
  • Locking toilet lids (to prevent unwanted objects getting lost in your black tank)
  • Securing RV windows since seats, beds and dinette booths put windows in arm’s reach

Just because you’re on vacation doesn’t mean babyproofing takes a vacation. In fact, when you’re preparing for RV travel with toddlers or a baby it’s even more important because the smaller space means nearly everything is within reach, and babies, especially toddlers, are fast!

Visit Parks with the Right Amenities

A fun RV trip means the whole family has fun, including young children. Look for parks and campgrounds that have something your baby/toddler can enjoy. Many parks have splash pads, swimming pools, playgrounds, or other easy activities.

RV parks with electrical hookups and water hookups are also something to consider. Unless you have solar to charge your battery, it’s easier to move about in the dark when you can turn the lights on with electrical hookup. It can also be a big help in the evenings if winding down after a big day of activity can include a little entertainment like watching an episode of their favorite show. Electricity also helps if baby likes to sleep with a nightlight.

Likewise, having water hookup supplies the bath water because children inevitably get dirty from a fun camping expedition or a diaper disaster!

Think About Safer Camping Options

While there is nothing wrong with camping remotely, if you typically enjoy boondocking, when you’re planning RV travel with toddlers you may want to rethink your destinations. If you are comfortable with being off the grid, just make sure you have emergency plans should the need arise.

Some alternate destinations include family-friendly campgrounds. There’s also the option of camping with family or friends. You’ll have extra help taking care of your baby, you may even be able to sneak in a precious nap if someone else is helping take care of your child.

Shorter trips that keep you closer to home can reduce the stress of RV travel with a baby. Should your RV have tire trouble or something happen to your tow vehicle while you’re on the road, you won’t be far from help. Getting lost or encountering car trouble can be stressful enough, but adding a young child in the mix who may be tired and cranky doesn’t make for a relaxing vacation. Also, when you stick nearby, there’s more time to enjoy your destination!

When you plan well and choose family-friendly camping locations, RV travel babies or toddlers becomes a pleasant adventure and you will create memories that last a lifetime.  

Contact RV Wholesale Superstore

The professionals at RV Wholesale Superstore are ready to help you find the perfect RV for you and your family. Visit us in-person at 5080 W. Alexis Road, in Sylvania, OH or call us at (866) 640-9871

Connect with us on Social Media!

Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Pinterest | Google+